Auteur Topic: Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS  (gelezen 5563 keer)

tine

  • Gold Member
  • Berichten: 8599
  • Geslacht: Vrouw
  • Nulglutendieet
De spierziekte ALS is vooral bekend geworden door de 'bucket challenge', een manier om geld in te zamelen voor deze slopende ziekte. Patienten met ALS hebben een levensverwachting van 3 tot 5 jaar. De hersenen kunnen geen signaal meer sturen naar de spieren, waardoor deze steeds verder uitvallen.

Er zijn enkele patiënten die aanvankelijk de diagnose ALS kregen, maar bij wie later coeliakie werd vastgesteld. Niet de 'gewone' vorm van coeliakie, maar de neurologische variant, ook wel glutenataxie genoemd. Hierbij krimpen de kleine hersenen als gevolg van een immuunreactie op gluten. Het is een reactie op het weefsel van de kleine hersenen, en niet zozeer op de slijmvlieslaag van de dunne darm.

Bij 'gewone' coeliakie is een bepaald type antistoffen te vinden in het bloed, TTG 2. Bij mensen met deze neurologische manifestatie van coeliakie wordt vaak een ander type antistoffen aangetroffen, TTG 6.

In bijgaand onderzoek worden patiënten met ALS onderzocht op de neurologische vorm van coeliakie. Hoewel zeldzaam, heeft een klein deel van de ALS-patiënten in werkelijkheid coeliakie. Hiervoor geldt een betere prognose. Door een glutenvrij dieet gaan de spieren niet verder achteruit.

Helaas is de vermindering van de hersenfunctie niet meer omkeerbaar. Dit in tegenstelling tot 'gewone' coeliakie, waarbij de darmvlokken weer kunnen herstellen. Eenmaal afgestorven hersencellen kunnen namelijk niet meer aangroeien.



JAMA Neurol. 2015 Apr 13. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.48. [Epub ahead of print]

Transglutaminase 6 Antibodies in the Serum of Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Gadoth A1, Nefussy B1, Bleiberg M2, Klein T3, Artman I1, Drory VE4.


Importance:

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten sensitivity can cause neurologic manifestations, such as ataxia or neuropathy, with or without gastrointestinal symptoms. Many patients with gluten ataxia produce antibodies toward the newly identified neuronal transglutaminase 6 (TG6). Two case reports described patients initially diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ultimately with celiac disease who improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

Objective:

To evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease-related antibodies and HLA antigen alleles, as well as TG6 antibodies, in patients with ALS and healthy individuals serving as controls to determine whether a neurologic presentation of a gluten-related disorder mimicking ALS might occur in some patients.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

In a case-control study conducted in an ALS tertiary center, we measured serum levels of total IgA antibodies, IgA antibodies to transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and endomysium, as well as IgA and IgG antibodies to deamidated gliadine peptide and TG6 and performed HLA antigen genotyping in 150 consecutive patients with ALS and 115 healthy volunteers of similar age and sex. Participants did not have any known autoimmune or gastroenterologic disorder and were not receiving any immunomodulatory medications. The study was conducted from July 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012.

Main Outcomes and Measures:

Antibody levels and frequency of individuals with abnormal antibody values as well as frequency of HLA antigen alleles were compared between patient and control groups.

Results:

All patients and control group participants were seronegative to IgA antibodies to TG2, endomysium, and deamidated gliadine peptide. Twenty-three patients (15.3%) were seropositive to TG6 IgA antibodies as opposed to only 5 controls (4.3%) (P = .004). The patients seropositive for TG6 showed a classic picture of ALS, similar to that of seronegative patients. Fifty patients and 20 controls were tested for celiac disease-specific HLA antigen alleles; 13 of 22 TG6 IgA seropositive individuals (59.1%) were seropositive for celiac disease-related alleles compared with 8 (28.6%) of the 28 seronegative individuals (P = .04). Mean (SD) levels of IgA antibodies to TG2 were 1.78 (0.73) in patients and 1.58 (0.68) in controls (normal, <10). In a subset of study participants, mean levels of deamidated gliadin peptide autoantibodies were 7.46 (6.92) in patients and 6.08 (3.90) in controls (normal, <16). Mean levels of IgA antibodies to TG6 were 29.3 (30.1) in patients and 21.0 (27.4) in controls (P = .02; normal, <26).

Conclusions and Relevance:

The data from this study indicate that, in certain cases, an ALS syndrome might be associated with autoimmunity and gluten sensitivity. Although the data are preliminary and need replication, gluten sensitivity is potentially treatable; therefore, this diagnostic challenge should not be overlooked.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25867286

Mijn zoon (19) en ik eten allebei glutenvrij. Wij zijn extreem gevoelig voor sporen van gluten (via besmetting, tarwe-derivaten en hulpstoffen). Ik ben wetenschapsredacteur voor het Glutenvrij Magazine van de NCV.

ine

  • Gold Member
  • *****
  • Berichten: 1155
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #1 Gepost op: april 23, 2015, 19:58:03 »
Een paar reacties op het onderzoek.


Alzheimer forum
Beware That Toast: Gluten Sensitivity in Some People with ALS?
20 Apr 2015

Could the treatment for the untreatable—that is, motor neuron disease—be as simple as, “Hold the bread”?
Vivian Drory and colleagues at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in Israel suggest that gluten sensitivity might masquerade as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a rare subset of cases.


In the April 13 JAMA Neurology, they report that some people diagnosed with ALS generate antibodies to an enzyme that processes gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.
These autoantibodies may be a sign of neurological gluten sensitivity, which is not the same as the classical celiac disease in which an inappropriate immune response to gluten inflames the gut.
While the observational data reported here are preliminary, they imply that a small proportion of people diagnosed with ALS might instead have a problem with gluten. Importantly, this would be treatable, said first author Beatrice Nefussy.


Other scientists contacted by Alzforum were skeptical about a link between gluten and this motor neuron disease.
One recent study reported no evidence of higher ALS rates among nearly 30,000 people with celiac disease (Ludvigsson et al., 2014).
Michael Swash of Royal London Hospital was unconvinced that avoiding gluten could treat motor neuron symptoms.
 “I think it is the wrong way to go,” he said. “There is no evidence whatsoever to think that would have any benefit.”


Drory’s interest in gluten was piqued by a patient with ALS who was recently diagnosed with celiac disease.
Delving into the scientific literature for any link between the two illnesses, co-first author Avi Gadoth noticed two case reports of something that looked like clinical ALS but turned out to be celiac disease (Turner et al., 2007; Brown et al., 2010).
In each case, switching to a gluten-free diet halted progression and improved the symptoms.
The diet switch could not completely reverse the movement problems, since axon damage had already occurred.


“The recovery was very substantial,” wrote one of those case study authors, Kevin Talbot of the University of Oxford in the U.K., in an email to Alzforum.
 “Our case is merely evidence that gluten sensitivity can damage the central nervous system,” he wrote.
“It does not support any relationship between gluten intolerance and ALS.”


Drory wondered if any other ALS patients at her medical center might have gluten sensitivity.
“We knew chances were slim, but we thought if even one in 100 [cases] turns out to be celiac disease, maybe we can save them,” Nefussy said.


The authors tested serum samples from 150 people with ALS and 115 healthy volunteers for celiac disease, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for antibodies to gluten peptides and to the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2).
When transglutaminases process gluten they make it more immunogenic.
Celiac patients generate autoantibodies to gluten and to TG2 (Di Sabatino et al., 2012).
Only one person, a control, had TG2 antibodies.
Nefussy suspects this person had undiagnosed celiac disease.
One person in the ALS group had antibodies to gluten, but not TG2.


Because not all gluten sensitivity manifests as celiac disease, the researchers broadened their study to cover a new entity called non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
NCGS has emerged as a sort of catchall to describe people who have trouble with gluten, but do not have the celiac-associated antibodies or a wheat allergy.
Researchers have linked NCGS to a variety of neurological manifestations, including ataxia, autism, and schizophrenia (Genuis and Lobo, 2014).


Swash noted that the concept of NCGS remains speculative, and no one has worked out how gluten might lead to neurological pathology.
Drory agreed that it has not been confirmed that all of these neurological syndromes are a direct result of gluten sensitivity, rather than a chance occurrence of both neurological disease and gluten sensitivity in one person.


To look for evidence of NCGS, Nefussy focused on a different version of transglutaminase, TG6.
She suspected it might be related to NCGS because it is mainly expressed in the brain, rather than the intestine (Liu et al., 2013).
Previously, researchers found anti-TG6 antibodies in what has been described as gluten ataxia.
The TG6 antibody titer paralleled the amount of gluten the patient ate, indicating the gluten induced the autoimmune reaction (Hadjivassiliou et al., 2008).

Mutations in TG6 have also been linked to spinocerebellar ataxia in China (Wang et al., 2010; Li et al., 2013).
However, the relationship between neurological symptoms and gluten sensitivity has been contested.  
TG6 antibodies did not help identify people with neurological symptoms, and antibody levels did not correlate with gluten intake in one study (Lindfors et al., 2011).


In Drory’s study, ELISAs indicated that 23 people with ALS had TG6 antibodies, including the person who had anti-gluten antibodies.
Clinically, there was no difference between these people and the others in the study, the authors reported.
“We might diagnose ALS, but some of these patients could have an ALS disease mimic that is autoimmune-mediated,” speculated Drory in an email to Alzforum.
That is, the autoimmune response to TG6 might damage motor neurons the same way the anti-TG2 response attacks the intestine lining.


Swash suggested that, more likely, neurons damaged by ALS release transglutaminase, stimulating an immune response.
Others have also suggested transglutaminase leaking from the spinal cord to the bloodstream as a potential marker for tissue damage in ALS (Fujita et al., 1998).


Drory's group found that five control participants had TG6 antibodies, as well.
The authors were not sure how to interpret this finding, but conjectured they might develop neurological symptoms in the future.


Scientists have not assessed transglutaminase antibodies in other neurodegenerative diseases, though they have studied the enzymes themselves.
Transglutaminase was upregulated in the hippocampuses of people who died of Alzheimer’s (Appelt et al., 1996).
Some researchers have suggested the enzyme might crosslink proteins such as Aβ, tau, huntingtin, and α-synuclein, contributing to their aggregation (reviewed in Jeitner et al., 2009).


Nefussy and colleagues reasoned that if anyone with TG6 antibodies did have NCGS, avoiding gluten should help.
They offered those patients assistance in going gluten-free.
Unfortunately, by the time they had the ELISA results, most of those people had died and the others had progressed to a late stage of disease.
Nefussy does not believe the diet would have helped because much neuronal damage had already been done.


In a new prospective trial, she aims to enroll people in earlier stages of ALS who test positive for TG6 antibodies, and start them on a gluten-free diet.
The treatment will include strict supervision by a nutritionist, Nefussy said.
People with ALS often have poor appetites and difficulty chewing and swallowing, so getting sufficient calories is already a challenge.


In past years, the topic of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease has generated some discussion in the ALS chatroom of PatientsLikeMe.
ALS patients who were gluten sensitive or had celiac disease shared there that going on a gluten-free diet did not affect their ALS symptoms.
Some noted that their overall health improved, others reported unwanted weight loss.


Curiously, however, Stephen Hawking, who at 73 exemplifies long-term survival with an unusual form of ALS, is reported to follow a gluten-free diet.

Story by  Amber Dance
http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/beware-toast-gluten-sensitivity-some-people-als




Israeli researchers propose link between gluten and ALS
Team from Tel Aviv Medical Center believes sensitivity to gluten experienced by people with celiac disease could cause a syndrome that looks like Lou Gehrig's disease.
Could sensitivity to gluten cause a syndrome that looks like ALS? Researchers from Israel think it might be possible
But, cautioned senior researcher Dr. Vivian E. Drory in an email, “this is a preliminary and by now a single report" on the association of ALS with antibodies to a certain kind of enzyme.

"I would be happy to see confirmation of our results from other centers," she said.
 

ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive disease that attacks nerve cells and pathways in the brain and spinal cord, eventually causing paralysis. More than 5,600 people are diagnosed with it each year.
 
Drory and her team from Tel Aviv Medical Center found antibodies to an enzyme produced in the brain, called tissue transglutaminase 6 (TG6), in 23 out of 150 patients with ALS, compared with only five of 115 healthy volunteers. Furthermore, the concentrations of those antibodies were higher in the ALS patients.
 
Antibodies to another transglutaminase, TG2, are produced by people with celiac disease when they eat gluten, a protein in wheat, barley and rye.
 
About 45% of patients with celiac disease also produce antibodies to TG6, even when they have no neurological symptoms. (In some patients, gluten sensitivity can cause neurologic problems, and many of those patients do have antibodies toward TG6.)
 
The authors report in JAMA Neurology that ALS patients with antibodies to TG6 showed the classic picture of ALS and the typical rate of disease progression. The volunteers with antibodies to TG6 showed no signs of any disease.
 
None of the ALS patients or volunteers had the antibodies to TG2 that are commonly associated with celiac disease, although the ALS patients were more likely than the volunteers to show the genetic mutations that put them at risk for celiac disease.
 
Drory said her team has begun to study TG6 antibody levels in patients newly diagnosed with ALS, and they will be testing the effects of a gluten-free diet in some of those that test positive.
 
She expects it will be "at least two more years" before they have any results.
 
In the meantime, she warns ALS patients against experimenting with themselves.
"Patients should not be tempted to use a gluten-free diet without clear evidence for antibodies, because an unbalanced diet might harm," she said.
 

"Especially in ALS we know that maintaining a good caloric intake and weight improves prognosis. While one can achieve a good caloric intake with a gluten-free diet, this should be done only under dietician advice and in the specific patients in whom antibodies are detected."
 
It’s also worth remembering that an association is not the same as a cause.
 At least one earlier study concluded that there was no association between TG6 antibodies and either neurological disease or gluten itself.

Bron: Ynetnews/Reuters



sympamis

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 73
  • Melissa
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #2 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 11:46:55 »
ALS is toch meer een verzameling van symptomen lijkt me, zoals de 'diagnose' PDS ook gegeven wordt.
Het verwondert me dus niet dat coeliakie soms wordt gezien als ALS.  Ik moet ook meteen denken aan lyme, omdat de symptomen van lyme, ALS, MS, coeliakie elkaar zo overlappen.  Mensen met lyme hebben baat bij een glutenvrij dieet enz...
Komt dit trouwens niet gewoon door het feit dat deze ziektes het immuunsysteem zodanig onder druk zetten?  Een immuunsysteem dat jarenlang onder hoge druk staat zorgt voor dezelfde symptomen, wat ook de oorzaak mag zijn van de initiële problemen.
Ik raak er meer en meer van overtuigd dat alle mensen met een verzwakte immuniteit vroeg of laat NCGS krijgen..
sympathiseert met coeliakie patiënten; heb zelf levenslange darmproblemen, erge vermoeidheid, geen diagnose - wel antistoffen tegen meer dan 30 voedingsstoffen, waaronder gluten, gliadine en veel graanvervangers

JosjeC

  • Gold Member
  • *****
  • Berichten: 1084
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #3 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 12:29:12 »
ALS is geen verzameling symptomen. Het is een zeer ernstige, zeer progressieve spierziekte waaraan mensen enkele jaren na de eerste symptomen overlijden. Vrij heftig om als 'misdiagnose' te krijgen dus.

Smulrol

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 248
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #4 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 14:28:38 »
ALS is toch meer een verzameling van symptomen lijkt me, zoals de 'diagnose' PDS ook gegeven wordt.

Echt niet. Mijn opa is aan ALS overleden, een vergelijking met Pds slaat de plank volledig mis.
De enige overeenkomst tussen die twee is dat er vooralsnog geen test is om ALS diagnose te stellen. De symptomen zijn echter wel duidelijk en zwaar progressief. Zodra andere verklaringen zijn uitgesloten heb je een korte toekomst en een nare dood in verschiet.
PDS is buikpijn waar je 100 mee kan worden.

sympamis

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 73
  • Melissa
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #5 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 17:32:19 »
Ik bedoelde natuurlijk niet dat ALS met PDS te vergelijken is qua symptomen.  Dat lijkt me nogal vanzelfsprekend.  Het spijt me als dat zo overkwam.  

Er zijn al wel vaker ernstige misdiagnoses gebeurd hoor.
Persoonlijk ken ik zelfs verschillende mensen wiens leven in gevaar was door een verkeerde diagnose (tonsillitis in plaats van leukemie om maar 1 geval te noemen).  En inderdaad ook mensen die een zware operatie ondergingen waarvan achteraf bleek dat die overbodig was.  Zulke dingen gebeuren maar daarvoor hoeven jullie niet op mij boos te worden..   Het verbaast me altijd dat de meeste mensen een onwankelbaar vertrouwen hebben in het kunnen van de medische wetenschap en het oordeelsvermogen van onze artsen.
Maar goed.. :z
sympathiseert met coeliakie patiënten; heb zelf levenslange darmproblemen, erge vermoeidheid, geen diagnose - wel antistoffen tegen meer dan 30 voedingsstoffen, waaronder gluten, gliadine en veel graanvervangers

Smulrol

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 248
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #6 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 18:54:52 »
 Zulke dingen gebeuren maar daarvoor hoeven jullie niet op mij boos te worden..  
Bedoel je mij daar mee?

JosjeC

  • Gold Member
  • *****
  • Berichten: 1084
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #7 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 19:03:33 »
..

JosjeC

  • Gold Member
  • *****
  • Berichten: 1084
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #8 Gepost op: april 25, 2015, 19:07:18 »
..

sympamis

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 73
  • Melissa
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #9 Gepost op: april 26, 2015, 12:15:47 »
Lieve mensen, ik had geen vermoeden dat ik blijkbaar overkom als een volslagen idioot.  Ik dacht niet dat het nodig was, maar ik leg er nogmaals de nadruk op dat ik ervan op de hoogte ben dat ALS inderdaad een verschrikkelijke ziekte is.
Mijn vergelijking heeft niets met de ziekte inhoudelijk te maken, het gaat me over de vorm.  Stel dat de glutenataxie waarvan sprake in dit topic, niet tijdig werd ontdekt, dan waren de patienten uiteindelijk enkele jaren later officieel overleden aan ALS.  (Op dezelfde wijze zijn er gevallen bekend van patienten die MS hebben, pas later de diagnose lyme krijgen.  Hoewel de MS misschien vermeden had kunnen worden als de lyme vroeger ontdekt was, is de schade wel onomkeerbaar geworden.)     

Ik heb het dan overigens over de gezondheidszorg. Niet de manier waarop wetenschappelijk onderzoek plaats vind. Veel artsen zouden wat mij betreft flink bijgeschoold mogen worden in 'wetenschappelijk denken'.
Precies, dat vind ik ook.

@Smulrol:  Nee, ik denk niet dat PDS een "buikpijn is waar je 100 mee kan worden".  Als je pijn hebt, is er iets mis en dan is daar een oorzaak voor.  Als daar niet aan gewerkt wordt, komen er ernstigere problemen van, ook al is dat vele jaren later. 

Ik zeg dit trouwens allemaal in de hoop dat vage tekens van patienten in de toekomst serieuzer zouden genomen worden.  Ik geloof niet dat dodelijke ziektes zoals ALS zomaar plotseling toeslaan uit het niets, en ik hoop dat er meer degelijk wetenschappelijk onderzoek naar gebeurt zodat mensen zo'n lijdensweg niet hoeven mee te maken.   
sympathiseert met coeliakie patiënten; heb zelf levenslange darmproblemen, erge vermoeidheid, geen diagnose - wel antistoffen tegen meer dan 30 voedingsstoffen, waaronder gluten, gliadine en veel graanvervangers

Smulrol

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 248
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #10 Gepost op: april 26, 2015, 16:15:17 »

@Smulrol:  Nee, ik denk niet dat PDS een "buikpijn is waar je 100 mee kan worden".  Als je pijn hebt, is er iets mis en dan is daar een oorzaak voor.  Als daar niet aan gewerkt wordt, komen er ernstigere problemen van, ook al is dat vele jaren later. 

Heb je hier ook bewijs voor?

sympamis

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 73
  • Melissa
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #11 Gepost op: april 26, 2015, 16:32:11 »
Heb je hier ook bewijs voor?
Er zijn met enkele clicks honderden getuigenissen te vinden.
sympathiseert met coeliakie patiënten; heb zelf levenslange darmproblemen, erge vermoeidheid, geen diagnose - wel antistoffen tegen meer dan 30 voedingsstoffen, waaronder gluten, gliadine en veel graanvervangers

Smulrol

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 248
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #12 Gepost op: april 27, 2015, 07:18:10 »
Er zijn met enkele clicks honderden getuigenissen te vinden.

dat je met PDS een verminderde levensverwachting hebt waardoor je geen 100 zou kunnen worden, heb je daar een linkje voor? Ik vind het nogal een statement namelijk.

sympamis

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 73
  • Melissa
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #13 Gepost op: april 27, 2015, 09:07:31 »
Meen je dat echt, moet ik hierop ingaan?  Op dit forum zijn er talloze mensen die jaren geleden al eens de diagnose PDS kregen en nu hier terecht komen omdat ze met zwaardere klachten te kampen hebben.  Denk jij nu écht dat dat losstaande feiten zijn?  Aanhoudende klachten in de darmen, waar zich 70% van alle cellen van het immuunsysteem zich bevinden, niet meer dan een onschuldig detail?  Meen je dat? 

En moet ik werkelijk ook ingaan op de vraag of er een linkje bestaat naar een bewijs dat je met PDS geen 100 kunt worden?  Vraag je dat nu uit boosaardigheid of onwetendheidheid?  Geloof jij braaf dat de Lieve Almachtige Wetenschappers Alles al weten en niets meer moeten onderzoeken?  No statistics, no problems? ;) 

Ik kan alleen maar hopen dat mensen die de 'diagnose' PDS gekregen hebben, hun zoektocht niet staken.
sympathiseert met coeliakie patiënten; heb zelf levenslange darmproblemen, erge vermoeidheid, geen diagnose - wel antistoffen tegen meer dan 30 voedingsstoffen, waaronder gluten, gliadine en veel graanvervangers

Smulrol

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Berichten: 248
Re:Neurologische vorm van coeliakie soms aangezien voor spierziekte ALS
« Reactie #14 Gepost op: april 27, 2015, 09:35:17 »
Meen je dat echt, moet ik hierop ingaan? 
Ja dat meen ik.
Ik zie graag wetenschappelijk bewijs voor de claims die jij doet.