Auteur Topic: 2/3 wereldpopulatie heeft vitamine D deficientie - advies hogere inname  (gelezen 2464 keer)

ine

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Volgens onderstaande artikelen heeft 2/3 van de wereldpopulatie
een vitamine D-deficientie.

Advies van wetenschappers om de dagelijkse inname te verhogen van
2,000 to 4,000 IU


Inmiddels heeft Osteoporosis Canada nieuwe richtlijnen voor
inname vitamine D ingesteld:
Citaat
Vitamin D: A key factor in good calcium absorption
New 2010 Vitamin D Recommendations

Hierin staat onder meer:
Q. What are some conditions that can interfere with vitamin D absorption?

A. Absorption of vitamin D can be interfered with by the following:

•Malabsorption syndrome: a condition or disease that causes poor absorption of vitamins and minerals, including celiac disease; cystic fibrosis; chronic liver disease or inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
•Having had gastric bypass surgery

Zie het gehele artikel op hun website:
http://www.osteoporosis.ca/index.php/ci_id/5536/la_id/1.htm



NewsMed.net:
Citaat
Two-thirds of world's population are vitamin D-insufficient or deficientVitamin D expert Anthony Norman recommends a daily intake of 2000 international units for most adults
Vitamin D surfaces as a news topic every few months. How much daily vitamin D should a person get? Is it possible to have too much of it? Is exposure to the sun, which is the body's natural way of producing vitamin D, the best option? Or do supplements suffice?

In the July 2010 issue of Endocrine Today, a monthly newspaper published by SLACK, Inc., to disseminate information about diabetes and endocrine disorders, Anthony Norman, a distinguished professor emeritus of biochemistry and biomedical sciences and an international expert on vitamin D, notes that half the people in North America and Western Europe get insufficient amounts of vitamin D.

"Elsewhere, it is worse," he says, "given that two-thirds of the people are vitamin D-insufficient or deficient. It is clear that merely eating vitamin D-rich foods is not adequate to solve the problem for most adults."

Currently, the recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 200 international units (IU) for people up to 50 years old; 400 IU for people 51 to 70 years old; and 600 IU for people over 70 years old.

pagina1:
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20100716/Two-thirds-of-worlds-population-are-vitamin-D-insufficient-or-deficient.aspx


There is a wide consensus among scientists that the relative daily intake of vitamin D should be increased to 2,000 to 4,000 IU for most adults," Norman says.
"A 2000 IU daily intake can be achieved by a combination of sunshine, food, supplements, and possibly even limited tanning exposure."

While there is now abundant data on vitamin D and its benefits, Norman believes there is room for more study.

"The benefits of more research on the topic justifies why this field of research deserves additional governmental funding," he says. "Already, several studies have reported substantial reductions in incidence of breast cancer, colon cancer and type 1 diabetes in association with adequate intake of vitamin D, the positive effect generally occurring within five years of initiation of adequate vitamin D intake."

Because vitamin D is found in very few foods naturally (e.g. fish, eggs and cod liver oil) other foods such as milk, orange juice, some yogurts and some breakfast foods are fortified with it.
The fortification levels aim at about 400 IU per day.

Norman, who holds the title of Presidential Chair in Biochemistry-Emeritus, has been researching vitamin D for nearly 50 years.
In 1967, his laboratory discovered that the vitamin is converted into a steroid hormone by the body.
Two years later, his laboratory discovered the vitamin D receptor (or VDR), an essential receptor for the steroid hormone form of vitamin D that is present in more than 37 target organs of the body that respond biologically to the vitamin.

"There is now irrevocable evidence that receptors in the immune, pancreas, heart-cardiovascular, muscle and brain systems in the body generate biological responses to the steroid hormone form of vitamin D," he says.

pagina 2:
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20100716/Two-thirds-of-worlds-population-are-vitamin-D-insufficient-or-deficient.aspx?page=2


University of California, Riverside
Citaat
More Than Half the World’s Population Gets Insufficient Amounts of Vitamin D,
Says UC Riverside Biochemist
Vitamin D expert Anthony Norman recommends a daily intake of 2000 international units for most adults

(July 15, 2010)
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Vitamin D surfaces as a news topic every few months. How much daily vitamin D should a person get? Is it possible to have too much of it? Is exposure to the sun, which is the body’s natural way of producing vitamin D, the best option? Or do supplements suffice?

In the July 2010 issue of Endocrine Today, a monthly newspaper published by SLACK, Inc., to disseminate information about diabetes and endocrine disorders, Anthony Norman, a distinguished professor emeritus of biochemistry and biomedical sciences and an international expert on vitamin D, notes that half the people in North America and Western Europe get insufficient amounts of vitamin D.

“Elsewhere, it is worse,” he says, “given that two-thirds of the people are vitamin D-insufficient or deficient. It is clear that merely eating vitamin D-rich foods is not adequate to solve the problem for most adults.”

Currently, the recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 200 international units (IU) for people up to 50 years old; 400 IU for people 51 to 70 years old; and 600 IU for people over 70 years old.

“There is a wide consensus among scientists that the relative daily intake of vitamin D should be increased to 2,000 to 4,000 IU for most adults,” Norman says. “A 2000 IU daily intake can be achieved by a combination of sunshine, food, supplements, and possibly even limited tanning exposure.”

While there is now abundant data on vitamin D and its benefits, Norman believes there is room for more study.

“The benefits of more research on the topic justifies why this field of research deserves additional governmental funding,” he says. “Already, several studies have reported substantial reductions in incidence of breast cancer, colon cancer and type 1 diabetes in association with adequate intake of vitamin D, the positive effect generally occurring within five years of initiation of adequate vitamin D intake.”

Because vitamin D is found in very few foods naturally (e.g. fish, eggs and cod liver oil) other foods such as milk, orange juice, some yogurts and some breakfast foods are fortified with it. The fortification levels aim at about 400 IU per day.

Norman, who holds the title of Presidential Chair in Biochemistry-Emeritus, has been researching vitamin D for nearly 50 years. In 1967, his laboratory discovered that the vitamin is converted into a steroid hormone by the body. Two years later, his laboratory discovered the vitamin D receptor (or VDR), an essential receptor for the steroid hormone form of vitamin D that is present in more than 37 target organs of the body that respond biologically to the vitamin.

“There is now irrevocable evidence that receptors in the immune, pancreas, heart-cardiovascular, muscle and brain systems in the body generate biological responses to the steroid hormone form of vitamin D,” he says.

Link:
http://newsroom.ucr.edu/news_item.html?action=page&id=2376

Artikel EndocrineToday:
Citaat
Surge of information on benefits of vitamin D, but no interventional trial data exist yet to ensure safety

http://www.endocrinetoday.com/view.aspx?rid=66516






Groeten, Ine